Category Archives: religion

McCain/Parsley and Islam

What is it about the main stream media, that they don’t want to deal with the obvious? I thought it was bad enough that it has taken so long to even make John Hagee a recognizable name directly connected to John McCain. Remember, McCain actively sought Hagee’s endorsement.

Now, I’ve discovered that McCain also has sought (and has not denounced or rejected) the endorsement of Rev. Rod Parsley a rabid anti-islam preacher. Don’t believe me? Check out the video.

Isn’t it curious that all these fringe people and beliefs belong to the Republicans, and isn’t it curious that the MSM hasn’t connected these people with McCain (can I add a yet to the sentence)?

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the all-white elephant

Frank Rich (New York Times) has a fantastic column today entitled, The All-White Elephant in the Room,© Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

in which he lambast the main stream media for its double standard.

…if there’s any coherent message to be gleaned from the hypocrisy whipped up by Hurricane Jeremiah, it’s that this nation’s perennially promised candid conversation on race has yet to begin.

This one is well worth the little time it takes to read. John Hagee is dealt with and questions are raised that have yet to be brought up by the MSM. The defense for not bringing up McCain’s ties to Hagee has been that McCain was not a member or Hagee’s church for 20 years. Mr. Rich points out however,

That defense implies, incorrectly, that Mr. McCain was a passive recipient of this bigot’s endorsement. In fact, by his own account, Mr. McCain sought out Mr. Hagee, who is perhaps best known for trying to drum up a pre-emptive “holy war” with Iran.

It should be interesting to see whether any in the MSM brings up the dead topic again without mentioning Hagee now that it has been exposed in the Times.

(image © Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)

intolerance

If you get a chance, go over to Citizen Zion. What I attempted to do with a few short videos, he accomplishes with strong words and logic… and he says himself that he is not an Obama supporter.

He prints in full text, verbatim, Rev. Wright’s words, and then does one better and prints some of Hagee’s words.

You’ll wonder, as I have wondered, why John Hagee has not had as much of an effect on John McCain. It seems that since a certain right wing tv station has not released any “snippets” of Hagee, the MSM hasn’t bothered to investigate on its own.

mccain/hagee and catholicism

I came across this YouTube video just yesterday and considering that I had made a point in an earlier post about the McCain/Hagee alliance, I decided to give Rev. Hagee a chance to speak for himself. How apropos since the Pope will be visiting the United States next week (starting Tuesday 4/15/2008). The video is under six minutes.

Meanwhile, as an aside, I found this interesting article over at The Rawstory:

The White House has scheduled a dinner next week in honor of Pope Benedict XVI’s first visit to the United States, but one guest will be conspicuously absent from the proceedings: the pope himself.

Rev. Wright, history and Rev. Hagee

I was watching The News Hour yesterday, and they had a panel of people discussing the political races and religion. There was one panelist who kept insisting that Obama would never get past the so called “Jeremiah Wright controversy,” because of Wright’s “crazy paranoia” about the government planting AIDS in the black community. I couldn’t believe he was so totally unaware of history and of the infamous Tuskegee experiments.

Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male
The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male[1] also known as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Pelkola Syphilis Study, Public Health Service Syphilis Study or the Tuskegee Experiments was a clinical study, conducted between 1932 and 1972 in Tuskegee, Alabama, in which 399 plus 201 control group without syphilis poor — and mostly illiterate — African American sharecroppers were denied treatment for syphilis.

This study became notorious because it was conducted without due care to its subjects, and led to major changes in how patients are protected in clinical studies.

My emphasis added. 1972. That wasn’t all that long ago.

PBS has the MP3 on their site of the segment or you can try to listen here.

That same panelist also seemed to indicate (I’m sorry, I just couldn’t believe what I was hearing), that if John McCain had a controversial minister supporting him, he would be criticized terribly. uh… Feb. 29th 2008, from CBS evening news:

(CBS) Today, it was Republican frontrunner John McCain‘s turn to answer mounting questions about one of his supporters, Rev. John Hagee, a San Antonio pastor with a worldwide broadcast ministry, reports CBS News senior political correspondent Jeff Greenfield.

Hagee has offered some highly provocative views on a variety of subjects.

For instance, he linked Hurricane Katrina to the gay rights movement: ” … All of the city was punished because of the sin that happened there in that city.”

He has also denounced the Roman Catholic Church as “the great whore of Babylon” and “a cult.” He blames it for the Holocaust and predicts its imminent demise.

“This is the apostate church,” Hagee said. ” … this false religious system is going to be totally devoured by the anti-Christ.”

It would seem to me that sometime during the great Jeremiah Wright issue, that there would be some reference made about Rev. Hagee, but the last I remember it is from that day. McCain’s response: “I don’t have to agree with everyone who endorses my candidacy,” he said. “They are supporting my candidacy. I am not endorsing some of their positions.”

Hey,… sounds good to me.